Michael Sandel’s Liberalism and the Limits of Justice

*this is a quick review/summation of the book, really for my own good... Michael Sandel's Liberalism and the Limits of Justice (LLJ) is a response to John Rawls' A Theory of Justice (TOJ), which was at the time (1982) the most compelling and articulate vision of political liberalism. More specifically Sandel's book is an examination and critique of the philosophical … Continue reading Michael Sandel’s Liberalism and the Limits of Justice

On MacIntyre’s Virtue and the Outsider

In a previous post on Alasdair MacIntyre's After Virtue I claimed that, it seems to me that MacIntyre’s approach seems to promote communal rigidity and sameness. This isn’t because his ethics builds intentional animosity toward otherness, but rather because it is so firmly rooted in distinctly communal history, wisdom, and tradition which can only therefore be fully coherent internally. Insofar as … Continue reading On MacIntyre’s Virtue and the Outsider

Untenable Unity (Reading Religion, Politics, and the Earth, pt II)

More thoughts on Clayton Crockett and Jeffrey Robbins' book Religion, Politics, and the Earth: The New Materialism. Earlier post is here. This thought is with Chantal Mouffe's critique of John Rawls and Jürgen Habermas - about them flattening the inevitability of real, irreducible difference by presuming rational consensus is possible (at least most of the … Continue reading Untenable Unity (Reading Religion, Politics, and the Earth, pt II)

Detached Materialism (Reading Religion, Politics, and the Earth, pt I)

I've just finished reading the new-ish book by Clayton Crockett and Jeffrey Robbins, Religion, Politics, and the Earth: The New Materialism. It's a fantastic and provocative book. I highly recommend it, and it's a model work for the interdisciplinary front where philosophy, religion, and political theory meet. "The New Materialism is a logic of sense, based … Continue reading Detached Materialism (Reading Religion, Politics, and the Earth, pt I)